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Flossing is an essential part of any oral health care routine. It helps remove plaque from between your teeth, in areas that the toothbrush can’t reach, and it helps prevent gum disease and dental decay. Plaque that is not removed with thorough daily brushing and cleaning between teeth can eventually harden into calculus or tartar.

As you age, it becomes even more important to take good care of your teeth and dental health. One common misconception is that losing your teeth is inevitable. This is not true. If cared for properly, your teeth can last a lifetime. Your mouth changes as you age. The nerves in your teeth can become smaller, making your teeth less sensitive to cavities or other problems.

Wise Choices

For healthy living and for healthy teeth and gums, think before you eat and drink. It’s not only what you eat but when you eat that can affect your dental health. Eat a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks. If you are on a special diet, keep your physician’s advice in mind when choosing foods.

For good dental health, keep these tips in mind when choosing your meals and snacks:

The American Dental Association recommends that you see your dentist at least twice a year for a checkup. At your appointment, we will inspect your teeth for oral cancer, periodontal disease and other problems. Dr. Holsen will access each tooth in your mouth to check for tooth decay, cracks, as well as old dental work. Sometimes, old dental work wears out and needs to be replaced.

Even though they are temporary, your child’s baby teeth are important, and are still susceptible to cavities. Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or Early Childhood Caries. Children need strong, healthy teeth to chew their food, speak and have a good-looking smile. Their first teeth also help make sure their adult teeth come in correctly.

More than 10 million Americans currently are affected by serious eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia and binge eating, according to the National Eating Disorders Association. While anyone can suffer from an eating disorder, they are most common in teenagers and young adult women.

Your body is a complex machine. The foods you choose and how often you eat them can affect your general health and the health of your teeth and gums, too. If you consume too many sugar-filled sodas, sweetened fruit drinks or non-nutritious snacks, you could be at risk for tooth decay.

If you’re embarrassed about your smile because of decay or dark resins in your teeth, you may be a good candidate for composite resins. A silicon-dioxide, tooth-colored plastic mixture, composite resins can restore teeth to an attractive, healthy, state. Composite resins represent several advantages over silver or amalgam fillings.

Because composite resins are not made of metal, we can mix and

A child’s primary teeth, sometimes called “baby teeth,” are as important as the permanent adult teeth. Primary teeth typically begin to appear when a baby is between age 6 months and 1 year. Primary teeth help children chew and speak. They also hold space in the jaws for permanent teeth that are growing under the gums.

The ADA recommends that a dentist examine a child within six months after the

Drinking water with fluoride helps prevent tooth decay. However, if your family drinks bottled water, you may be missing out on those benefits. That’s because many bottled waters do not contain fluoride. If you want to know if the bottled water you drink contains fluoride, be sure to check the label.

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